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Jun 03 2017

Tips for cracking the IELTS exam with high band

IELTS stands for International English Language Testing System. The following course is actually to measure the level of English language proficiency of candidates who want to study or work where English is used as a compulsory language of communication. The IELTS test was developed by some the world’s leading experts in language assessment. The test has a reputation for excellence and is accepted over 9,000 organisations across the globe that would include schools, universities, employers, immigration authorities and professional organisations. The IELTS test assesses your listening, reading, writing, speaking skills in less than 3 hours.

Updates on Making Visa Applications for Australia (9)

 

Here are tips on cracking the IELTS exams and earning the high bands

12 IELTS Speaking Tips

 

Speaking test

 

  1. Be formal

During your speaking test be formal, treat it like a job interview, just like an interview use full sentences and speak as clear as possible.

  1. Give a full answer

You might want to try to show off when you need to use the best of your English when the examiner asks you a question but that is not something you would want to do, for eg. If someone asks you where are you from? Don’t just say ‘Delhi’, you might want to answer ‘I come from Delhi the capital of India’. Use full sentences.

  1. Be polite / cultured

If the examiner asks for something that you may not have heard use words such as “excuse me could you please repeat that” or “sorry I did not understand you”.

  1. Maintain a good posture

The posture actually affects the way you speak your display of confidence, maintaining a good upright posture helps maintain a positive reaction while speaking and displays confidence even when nervous

  1. Speak clearly

Speaking clearly enhances your communication skills and helps avoid any kind of miss-communications as well as important things that are being looked out for by the examiner.

  1. Use descriptive words

Use the best English you have, don’t use words that are commonly or overly used during conversations. For e.g. don’t use words such as good, bad, okay etcetera. Use exciting words like fine thank you or I am having a lovely day.

  1. Speak up

Make sure you speak loudly and clearly enough so that the examiner in front of you is aware of “what you have said”? And the recording taken must be heard by the examiner clearly too.

  1. Keep a steady pace

That means don’t speak too fast and don’t speak too slowly if you are not sure how fast you should speak, speak slower than you think it is necessary because that way it is much more likely that you would be understood.

  1. Explain foreign words

Foreign words can also be the names of cities, for eg. If the examiner asks you where are you from? And you need to use the name of a city or a town which is not in common knowledge, like Hyderabad or Punjab, so suppose you are migrating to Australia and you are asked where so you come from? Saying Hyderabad is a bit of a mouthful and also an unfamiliar word, so what you could do is say “I come from a city in the southern part of India called Hyderabad.

  1. Stay on topic

You want to make sure that you answer the question asked and not go off topic but keep in mind using full sentences.

  1. Don’t use slang

Your best English, for e.g. Slang is kids, things, stuff instead of using this you could use children, items

  1. Don’t memorise answers

Reading model answers are good but don’t try to memorise the answer, take ideas, vocabulary etc.

10 IELTS Writing Tips

 

Writing test

 

  1. Read the question – answer the question

Rule number 1 is to answer the question: read the question carefully and underline all the information you need to include. This works differently in the essay and the report.

In the essay, often you will find background information and the question itself. Make sure you answer the question

(eg “Do you agree?”) And do not write generally about the topic. If you copy another essay you have written on the same topic, you will lose a lot of marks.

  1. Don’t start writing too soon – think and plan!

It is important to finish both pieces of writing, but the way to do this is not necessarily starting to write immediately. If you do that, you may get half way through the writing and realise you cannot finish it. Only start writing when you know how you are going to finish.

In the essay, this can mean up to 10 minutes and in the task 1 report, it can mean up to 5 minutes. The more you think, the better and more quickly you will write. 2/3 minutes is almost certainly not enough.

  1. Write enough words

250 means AT LEAST 250 and 150 means AT LEAST 150.

  1. Don’t write too many words

The more words you write, you more mistakes you are likely to make. The more words you write, the less efficient you become and the quality will fall. The ideal is to aim for between 260 – 280 words in the essay and 160-180 words in the report.

  1. Don’t copy whole sections of the question

If you copy whole sections of the question, the examiner will not include those words in your word count: 260 words can become 230 words if you are not careful.

  1. Time is your enemy – have a plan and a watch

Timing can be a problem. It is important to keep moving and stick to your timing. Don’t be tempted to spend more than 40 minutes on your essay – you need 20 minutes to answer task 1 properly.

  1. Task 1 and Task 2 – which do you answer first?

The essay is worth twice the marks of the report. One idea is to do task 2 (the essay) before task 1(the report), just to ensure you finish the essay. You do need to spend at least 20 minutes on part 1 though. Do not try to answer it in 15 minutes.

  1. Check your writing

It is important to check your writing for grammatical errors. You need to have a checklist before you enter the exam of what mistakes you typically make.

  1. Think about range of vocabulary

You should also check your writing for unnecessary word repetition – you are graded on the variety of your language. You should note that this does not mean you need to use long, complex words, rather it means you should use precise words.

  1. Think about the examiner – use paragraphs well

The examiner will not spend very long grading your paper. You need to create an immediate good impression and the best way to do this in my experience is to present a well-structured piece of writing with clearly laid out paragraphs. This way the examiner is going to be on your side. If, however, it looks disorganised, the examiner is not going to be impressed.

7 quick tips to crack the Reading Test

 

  1. Multitasking: You are listening to the audio, reading the questions and writing the answers all at the same time.
  2. Lose track: If your focus gets diverted even for a few seconds you lose the complete track of the audio.
  3. It’s a rapid exercise: Questions follow each other very closely; hence speed has to be maintained along with concentration.
  4. Strict time management: You get 30 minutes of the complete exercise and then 10 additional minutes to transfer your answers to the sheet. If you are prepared well, this is a good amount of time else, it’s a big challenge.
  5. Hit or miss: You are allowed to listen to audio clip “only once” against other listening exams where the audio clip is played minimum twice. Hence, this makes it a little difficult since you have to be equally alert all through 40 minutes as there is no second chance available.
  6. Concentration: It’s quite a task to keep your brain glued to one exercise for as long as 40 minutes at a stretch with no scope of divulgence.
  7. YouTube- a handy tool: Try and listen to a lot of English videos on YouTube. This will increase your retention, understanding and will help you get comfortable with the speed and accent.

6 Tips of crack the Listening Test

 

  1. Multitasking: You are listening to the audio, reading the questions and writing the answers all at the same time.
  2. Lose track: If your focus gets diverted even for a few seconds you lose the complete track of the audio.
  3. It’s a rapid exercise: Questions follow each other very closely; hence speed has to be maintained along with concentration.
  4. Strict time management: You get 30 minutes of the complete exercise and then 10 additional minutes to transfer your answers to the sheet. If you are prepared well, this is a good amount of time else, it’s a big challenge.
  5. Hit or miss: You are allowed to listen to audio clip “only once” against other listening exams where the audio clip is played minimum twice. Hence, this makes it a little difficult since you have to be equally alert all through 40 minutes as there is no second chance available.
  6. Concentration: It’s quite a task to keep your brain glued to one exercise for as long as 40 minutes at a stretch with no scope of

We wish you all the luck for your IELTS test and for further queries do feel free to contact or chat with our consultants they would be pleased to help you.